One DIY green gnome with three red tartan plaid gnomes.

Plaid Gnomes

Will you be gnome for the holidays? Or will you be gnoming? πŸ˜‚ Today’s project inspiration is Ruth’s beautiful plaid gnomes!

They are so festive and striking. This batch is definitely a favorite of mine.

Some things just never go out of style. IMO, plaid is classic and timeless. The traditional fabric works so well for gnomes.

I’ve always been a huge fan of plaid! Back in the day, I had plaid pants and plaid skirts. Thank goodness there were no social media accounts to document it.πŸ˜†

More Gnome Ideas

Gnome pattern & ideas
Christmas gnomes
Gnome wine bottle toppers

Tartan Plaid Gnomes

For these holiday gnomes, instead of the usual sweater material, Ruth used regular fabric for the plaids. (She did use recycled sweaters for the body and arms though.)

Look for plaid fabrics that are not too flimsy or see-through. You will also be stuffing the hat which helps firm it up.

What is Tartan Plaid?

In simple terms, plaid is a Scottish word for blanket or wrap, but it has multiple meanings.

Sometimes, tartan plaid describes the crisscross pattern of a tartan print of two or more colors.

It can also refer to the fabrics that are interwoven into the patterns or the cloth itself. These can then be turned into clothing or goods for your home.

And lastly, for people from Scotland, plaid is used to describe a garment, that is usually part of a traditional costume.

Buffalo Plaid Gnomes

As I’m sure you’re aware you can find buffalo plaids in a variety of colors. The most popular combinations are red-and-black and black-and-white.

Ruth selected this awesome green and black which is so unique, but equally festive and fitting for Christmas.

These gnomes have such a strong presence especially when displayed as a group.

What is Buffalo Plaid?

Buffalo plaid is a broad checked plaid design that typically consists of two colors.

The plaid pattern was brought over to the United States in the 1800s by Jock McCluskey. He befriended people from many native tribes as he worked as a trader.

According to legend, the Native Americans believed the heavy Scottish blankets in the MacGregor red-and-black were valuable and prized them.

Eventually, the buffalo plaid made its way to Pennsylvania to the Woolrich Woolen Mill.

In 1850, Woolrich began producing the most popular and classic, red-and-black buffalo-plaid shirts. They were an immediate success.

Buffalo plaid was quickly embraced by cowboys for use as shirts and saddle blankets.

The pattern remains popular today and is widely used in clothing and home goods. And now, GNOMES! πŸ˜ƒ

Free Gnome Pattern

If you would like to make your own plaid gnomes, you can download the free pattern when you subscribe to my email list.

You will then receive an email (in about 15 minutes) with a link and the password to log in to the free library. This will give you access to this pattern and all project downloads.

When you get into the library, look for the thumbnail photo of the gnomes. Click it to open the PDF, then click the download icon to download the pattern.

After you download and print the PDF, follow the instructions in the post, how to make easy DIY gnomes.

Wishing you lots of fun in your projects. Enjoy all of the creative opportunities the holiday brings.

Oh and please let me know if you make your own collection of plaid gnomes in the comments box below.

Peace out Gnomie.😁
xo,
Cindy

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Plaid References

Here are my sources for the rich history of tartan and buffalo plaid. There is so much more to learn. Check out these websites below.

An overview of tartan history.

CLAN Scotweb Site

A detailed summary of the history of buffalo plaid.

Scottish Tartans Authority

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